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Aollatino: Another Icon Of The So-called Latino Market

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Aollatino

Aollatino: Today, I had to say goodbye to  another icon of the so-called Latino market, in yet another proof that I’ve been around this company for far too long: AOL Latino

Today, I had to say goodbye to another another icon of the so-called Latino market, in yet another proof that I’ve been around this company for far too long

Aollatino in 2003 Increasing  Market

Aollatino

AOL Latino (www.aollatino.com) will cease to exist as we’ve known it for almost a decade as of today (May 1st, of all days!) and will instead become ‘Voces,’ another vertical of the formidable The Huffington Post Media Group.

AOL Latino debuted in 2003 with a lot of hype and a lot of marketers anxious to tap into the increasing power of the Hispanic market in the United States, so its death truly symbolises the end of an era.

It further solidifies Arianna Huffington’s position as the Queen of Aggregation (now also available in Spanish), implying that, in her never-ending quest to gather material, she is likewise determined to aggregate web sites.

‘Voces,’ according to HuffPost officials, is not a translation of HuffPost Latino Voices, the English-language Latino-themed vertical that began last year.

They also promise me that it will have its own personality, content, and editorial team, but it is probable that some content from across the site will be repurposed and that it will help cross-promote articles and opinion pieces in both languages.

Also, don’t forget that “El Huffington Post,” a collaboration with Spain’s El Pas daily set to premiere later this year, will bring us more Spanish HuffPost-branded merchandise.

It’s too early to say what awaits the erstwhile AOL Latino under the sombrero of the Huffington Post. But, before Arianna comes knocking, independent content creators and bloggers like myself should cling on to our properties. What are the chances? Perhaps you’ll be reading me on the next occasion.

will cease to exist as we’ve known it for almost a decade as of today (May 1st, of all days!) and will instead become ‘Voces,’ another vertical of the formidable The Huffington Post Media Group.

AOL Latino debuted in 2003 with a lot of hype and a lot of marketers anxious to tap into the increasing power of the Hispanic market in the United States, so its death truly symbolises the end of an era.

It further solidifies Arianna Huffington’s position as the Queen of Aggregation (now also available in Spanish), implying that, in her never-ending quest to gather material, she is likewise determined to aggregate web sites.

‘Voces,’ according to HuffPost officials, is not a translation of HuffPost Latino Voices, the English-language Latino-themed vertical that began last year.

They also promise me that it will have its own personality, content, and editorial team, but it is probable that some content from across the site will be repurposed and that it will help cross-promote articles and opinion pieces in both languages.

Also, don’t forget that “El Huffington Post,” a collaboration with Spain’s El Pas daily set to premiere later this year, will bring us more Spanish HuffPost-branded merchandise.

It’s too early to say what awaits the erstwhile AOL Latino under the sombrero of the Huffington Post. But, before Arianna comes knocking, independent content creators and bloggers like myself should cling on to our properties. What are the chances? Perhaps you’ll be reading me on the next occasion.

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